Stocks Descend from Recent Peaks

Weekly Commentary — July 22nd, 2019

The Week on Wall Street

Stock benchmarks retreated during the first week of the second-quarter earnings season. As some big names shared quarterly results, investors seemed more interested in what might happen at the Federal Reserve’s upcoming policy meeting.

For the week, the S&P 500 declined 1.23%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 0.65%, and the Nasdaq Composite, 1.18%. International stocks, measured by the week-over-week performance of the MSCI EAFE index, were down 0.79%.[1],[2]     

Households Bought More Last Month

Retail sales were up 0.4% in June, according to the Department of Commerce. Consumer purchases account for more than two-thirds of America’s gross domestic product, and data like this may rebut some assertions that the economy is losing steam.[3]

Traders still expect the Federal Reserve to make a rate cut at the end of this month, even with low unemployment, solid consumer spending, and stocks near record peaks. Ordinarily, the Fed lowers interest rates to try to stimulate business growth and investment when the economy lags. After ten years without a recession, its new challenge is to make appropriate moves to ward off such a slowdown.[4]

Will Wall Street’s Expectations Be Met?

Thursday, Federal Reserve Bank of New York President John Williams noted that Fed policymakers could proactively adjust interest rates and take “preventative measures” to ward off a potential slowdown. A New York Fed spokesperson later said that Williams’ comments were “academic” and did not concern “potential policy actions.” Still, Fed Vice President Richard Clarida made similar comments last week, expressing the view that Fed officials “don’t have to wait until things get bad to have a dramatic series of rate cuts.”[5]

Two other Fed officials – Esther George and Eric Rosengren – have publicly stated that they are not in favor of a cut.[6]

What’s Next

About 25% of S&P 500 companies report earnings this week. In addition, the federal government will present its first snapshot of the economy’s second-quarter performance.

 

THE WEEK AHEAD: KEY ECONOMIC DATA

Tuesday: June existing home sales figures appear from the National Association of Realtors.

Wednesday: The Census Bureau presents its June report on new home buying.

Friday: The Bureau of Economic Analysis releases its initial estimate of Q2 economic growth.

Source: Econoday / MarketWatch Calendar, July 19, 2019

 

THE WEEK AHEAD: COMPANIES REPORTING EARNINGS

Monday: Celanese (CE), Halliburton (HAL), TD Ameritrade (AMTD)

Tuesday: Coca-Cola (KO), Texas Instruments (TXN), Visa (V)

Wednesday: AT&T (T), Boeing (BA), Facebook (FB), PayPal (PYPL)

Thursday: Alphabet (GOOGL), Amazon (AMZN), Anheuser-Busch (BUD), Intel (INTC), Starbucks (SBUX)

Friday: AbbVie (ABBV), Colgate-Palmolive (CL), McDonald’s (MCD)

Source: Zacks, July 19, 2019

 

“A vacation is having nothing to do and all day to do it in.”

– Robert Orben

 

Short-Term Rentals, Long-Term Income Tax Deductions

If you have a short-term vacation rental, you may be bringing in some extra income this summer season. By following a few easy tips, you can reduce your income taxes and keep more of what you make (some of which might go into a savings account for a vacation of your own!). Here are some helpful tips that short-term rental owners should consider:

  • You don’t have to pay income tax on what you earn from your short-term rental, but only if you don’t rent it out for more than 14 days throughout the year, and also, if you live in it as your primary residence for at least 14 days out of the year.
  • Keep thorough records as well as separate business and personal expenses. You may be able to deduct all ordinary and necessary expenses to operate the rental home.
  • If you rent out a room in your home rather than the entire property, you may still be able to deduct a portion of the mortgage interest and property taxes of the property. But you still need to delineate between personal and business use of the residence.

 

Renting out an extra property or an extra space in your house is a great way to make some extra cash, and the tax laws may work in your favor.

 

* This information is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax advice. We suggest that you discuss your specific tax issues with a qualified tax professional.

Tip adapted from TurboTax[7]

 

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If you have any questions or would like to learn more about developing strategies to pursue a prosperous and safe future, contact me today at Derek.Merkler@Parsonex.com! You can also visit my website to learn about how I help our service members and veterans plan for and achieve financial independence.

My blog discusses a myriad of financial topics and challenges, book reviews, and commentary on current events in the financial world to benefit our military and veteran community.  I attempt to be as thorough as possible when examining each subject but can never account for every possible scenario.  Please remember to consult with your advisers for advice on your particular situation.  Thank you for reading!

Advisory Services offered through Parsonex Advisory Services, Inc. 8310 S. Valley Highway, Ste. 110, Englewood, CO 80112 (303) 662-8700.


[1]https://www.wsj.com/market-data

[2]https://quotes.wsj.com/index/XX/990300/historical-prices

[3]https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/17/the-feds-expected-rate-cut-not-supported-by-economic-data.html

[4]https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/17/the-feds-expected-rate-cut-not-supported-by-economic-data.html

[5]https://www.thestreet.com/markets/stocks-climb-rate-cut-hopes-microsoft-earnings-15025435

[6]https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/19/feds-rosengren-not-on-board-for-rate-cut-i-think-we-should-wait.html

[7]https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tips/rental-property/10-tax-tips-for-airbnb-homeaway-vrbo-vacation-rentals/L8CEWgLSP

 

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